Revisiting Some Old For Loop Lore

Submitted by cwestin on
Setting the Scene

From time to time, I get told that I write strange-looking for loops. This goes back almost thirty years to some tricks I picked up at Oracle when I was working on the RDBMS kernel. The state of compilers was much more primitive then than it is now. C++ didn't exist, and there wasn't even an ANSI C standard yet.

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Web Browsers Need to Support User Personas

Submitted by cwestin on

I've gotten involved in an activity which uses various social networks to promote itself. The organizers have a twitter account for the entity, and share control over a Facebook page and LinkedIn groups for it.

Managing this is painful. When I want to tweet about something from the activity-specific twitter account, I have to sign out of my twitter account, sign in to the other, send the tweet, sign back out, and sign back in to my personal account. Imagine doing that for three or more other applications.

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Data Models

Submitted by cwestin on

Accessing data in a database depends on the data model implemented by that database. The data model affects the operations available and the API used by clients to operate on that data. Different data models may provide more or less raw functionality. Usually, the less functionality provided directly by the data model, the more the client application must do for itself.

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RDBMS - The Sequels

Submitted by cwestin on

There are a lot of buzzwords around databases these days: availability, scalability, single-master, dynamo, documents, key-value stores, etc.

Unfortunately, I haven't seen a good roundup of things to think about when choosing a data storage technology. There's certainly a lot of hype, and a lot of activity on blogs and the twittersphere.

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